Category Archives: New Photographs

Blog posts about new photographs at Astro Photography Australia. All photographs are available for purchase as prints and digital files.

An oldie but a goodie – the Moon

The Moon, photographed using a Fuji X-E2 camera on a William Optics Megrez 90 telescope.

The Moon, photographed using a Fuji X-E2 camera on a William Optics Megrez 90 telescope.

Well, it may “just” be The Moon but it still satisfies an itchy camera trigger finger! This was a casual snap using my Fuji X-E2 on the Moon. To be honest it’s the first time I have used the Fuji for the Moon, and it performed very well as expected. Great low noise levels and fun using the remote connect and transfer app to the iPad, saving me craning my neck in to position to check focus. The v4 firmware update from Fuji for the X-E2 introduced Electronic Shutter, which makes for silent and vibrationless shooting which was fantastic in this case by removing the vibration otherwise introduce by the shutter. The lighter weight camera body compared to my 6D makes holding it firm on the telescope easier, as there’s less weight to pull on the focuser draw tube and associated fittings.

The moon was not quite full in this photograph, about 12 hours off being full, so you can see a little bit of shadow detail on the left.

Pre-Dawn Nightscape Bliss

I traveled to one of my favorite locations in the WA Wheat belt for a night of astrophotography on Saturday 2nd July. Unfortunately it wasn’t long after arriving that the rain started! (even I can’t always predict the weather with 100% accuracy.). After much analysis of the weather predictions I set my alarm for 4am and went to bed. 4am came and wow was it a clear sky! A quick excursion ensued, exploring the surrounding area and coming across some fantastic nightscape scenes.

My first surprise was when I turned out the gate from the paddock on to the road, walked a few steps, looked up, and wow, there was Orion! Hello Orion! It’s always so surprising how quickly Orion comes back to our morning sky.

Constellation of Orion rising in pre-dawn Zodiacal Glow down country road.

Constellation of Orion rising in pre-dawn Zodiacal Glow down country road.

Turning to the south another fantastic sight greeted me. This time the Magellanic Clouds perfectly positioned over a wonderfully sculpted eucalyptus tree.

Magellanic Clouds in Wheatbelt WA

Magellanic Clouds in Wheatbelt WA

To cap it all off, here is a beautiful panorama of the Moon rising low over mist and cloud with the star cluster Pleiades on the left, the constellation of Orion on the right, and beautiful zodiacal glow extending up from the horizon. Oh, also throw in just a hint of beautiful pre-dawn colour on the horizon.

Pre-dawn bliss. Pleaides, crescent moon rising, Zodiacal Glow, and the constellation of Orion!

Pre-dawn bliss. Pleaides, crescent moon rising, Zodiacal Glow, and the constellation of Orion!

Horsehead and Flame Nebulas in Orion

The Horsehead and Flame Nebulas in the constellation of Orion.

The Horsehead and Flame Nebulas in the constellation of Orion.

People often don’t realise how hard to see the horsehead nebula is. It is quite a faint nebula located in the constellation of Orion, faint enough that you need a reasonably large amateur telescope (for example 15″ aperture reflector such as a dobsonian) and dark skies to visually see it.

Photographically the Horsehead is well known and captured by amateur astronomers. It sits along side one of the brighter stars in the constellation of Orion, Alnitak, which is one of the three bright stars making up the Belt of Orion. The Flame Nebula is also located adjacent to Alnitak.

 

Tarantula Nebula

NGC 2070 (Tarantula Nebula)

NGC 2070 (Tarantula Nebula)

This is a photograph of the very well known and popular to photograph Tarantula Nebula, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (a companion galaxy of our Milky Way). This photograph was taken using a SBIG ST8-XME camera on a telescope at 2180mm focal length. The combined exposure time is 304 minutes. There is nice star colour retained in addition to the obvious pink of the general nebula, making this quite a colourful image.

The Moon – December 2015

The Moon - 20th December 2015

The Moon – 20th December 2015

Every now and then it’s fun to just whip out the camera and snap a straight forward photograph of the Moon. 20th December was just such an occasion for me, typically a deep sky and dark sky astrophotographer. There is something always satisfying about a simple, crisp, clean photograph of the Moon.

On this occasion the moon was a little of 9 days old, so becoming quite bright and round. It is photographed through my 90mm William Optics Megrez 90 APO telescope at a focal length of approximately 1200mm using my Canon 6D. Ordinarily in my workshops I advise using video for high resolution images of the moon, but as I also say rules are there for breaking and in this case it’s just a simple single frame out of the camera.