Tag Archives: antares

Red at Night

Red at Night

I have been working on-and-off with several shots like this, both individual and panoramics much larger than this one, trying to find the right balance between the extreme natural reds and browns of the Kalbarri gorges and the night sky. Of course there in person with no torch or other light you see a darker scene than this. But as an artist I am trying to bring the different elements of the landscape together, the beautiful dark night sky and the amazing vibrant layers of sandstone, and attempting to end up with an attractive balance. I may yet revisit this one as I continue with other images from the 4 nights at Kalbarri.

Shown are the Small Magellanic Cloud (left) with the Milky Way extending from horizon to top right. The Southern Cross and Pointers are visible not far from the horizon in the Milky Way. Antares is the bright red/yellow star near the top right corner surrounded by a little pink nebulosity. Saturn is at the bottom right, almost directly below Antares and appears fainter than Antares and the Pointers.

This nightscape was taken in the Kalbarri National Park. The foreground is illuminated using flashes with specifically chosen gel filters to best approximate daylight colours, giving you this great combination of the gorge and the night sky.

 

Antares With Nebulosity

This evening I thought I would have some fun with my Canon 6D on my Megrez 90, the telescope is permanently mounted in my observatory and not often used these days, with my focus instead on science through the 12″ SCT or wide field nightscape photography out and about.

I went straight to one of my favourite regions of the sky, the areas of nebulosity near the bright star Antares in the constellation of Scorpius. This area is just so dynamic and colourful. Full of star clusters and varying colours of nebulosity while being embedded in the sea of stars that is the central area of our Milky Way galaxy. The region is also known as theĀ Rho Ophiuchi Nebula.

Antares-with-Nebulosity-by-Roger-Groom

Technically, this is a two frame panoramic where each frame is a stack of 10 exposures each being three minutes in length and at 3200ISO.