Wheatbelt Horizon Filled with Stars

I really like this shot. The subtle colours and millions of stars, together with that wide open horizon familiar to the Wheatbelt in Western Australia. As much as I love the panoramic effect of my previous post this and others like the Spire in the Sky are more what I aim for.

From last weekend also, this shot is taken from one of my favourite camping spots, Kokerbin Rock (if you go there take wood, please don’t deforest the park for your personal camp fire like so many do! 🙁 ). The small light domes on the horizon of this photograph are likely related to the town of Bruce Rock to the east, another town I used to frequent on my way to dark skies to the east of Bruce Rock.

Wheatbelt Horizon Filled with Stars

This northern part of the milky way (as viewed from the latitude of 31 degrees south!) is quite different to the more prominent and commonly photographed areas including the Southern Cross, the central bulge near Scorpio, and the Eta Carina region in that it has less distinct features. What this results in is the millions of stars making up distant Milky Way becoming the primary focus and that sea of stars being much more of a even splattering across the horizon, yet still so condensed compared to the non-Milky-Way regions of the sky. It is the absence of dominating bright constellation stars and nebulas which make this part of the sky so appealing to the eye and mind.